Things To Do In Chicago This Week

By Jenn Harrman on April 9, 2014

TOURSDAILY

With so many things to do in Chicago each week, we help you sift through them and bring you our top picks in Chicago architecture and history. This week we highlight a new experience at a Frank Lloyd Wright home, a Chicago blues performance in historic Bronzeville, and a discussion on the restoration of a Louis Comfort Tiffany masterpiece.

1. After Hours – Robie House, 5757 S. Woodlawn Ave.

MUSIC AND COCKTAILS – Friday, April 11th, 5:00pm-8:00pm

$30 Members/$35 Non-members – reservations required

This month, Frank Lloyd Wright’s Robie House will open every Friday after hours for an evening of light music, appetizers, drinks and exploration in the atmosphere of the Wright masterpiece. With the recent opening of the Robie House balcony, this is a unique opportunity to see the house in a new perspective… as a party guest.

 

Kinship Project Archive Parkway ballroom chicago blues
Photo Credit: Kinship Project Archive

 

2. Stompin’ at the Parkway Ballroom – 4455 S. King Dr.

CONCERT – Saturday, April 12th, 7:00pm-11:00pm (dance lesson 7pm-8pm)

$10 – reservations required

A super cool overlooked place for a night of Chicago blues music and dancing is the Parkway Ballroom, once a hotspot for music during the 1940’s, 50’s and 60’s. The ballroom was the stage for jazz and Chicago blues favorites including Count Basie and Nat King Cole during its heyday and this event hopes to bring back some of that spirit. Hosted by local artist Samantha Hill, music will be performed by “LB’s Blues Machine” featuring Lorna Boston. Ticket also includes a free blues dance lesson among other fun things to do.

3. Rescuing the Flamingos – Driehaus Museum, 40 E. Erie St.

LECTURE – Sunday, April 13th, 2:00pm

$10 Members/$18 Public – reservations required

The restoration of Louis Comfort Tiffany’s “Feeding the Flamingos,” designed for the Chicago World’s Columbian Exposition of 1893 here, is the topic of this lecture. After the fair, this stained glass window was incorporated into Tiffany’s own home, Laurelton Hall, but the colorful masterpiece was heavily damaged when the home caught fire in 1957. It’s now a part of the Charles Hosmer Morse Museum of Art in Winter Park, Florida, and Venturella Studio of New York City recently restored it. At the Driehaus Museum, Mr. Venturella will discuss the restoration process and the correction of previously executed repairs to one of Tiffany’s most important artistic works in the decorative arts of the 19th century.